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will america do to stop a madman. >> i am a supporter of the second amendment. but i believe it's time for us to move a different direction. >> and the congresswoman who lost her husband in the long island railroad shooting. >>> also, i'll go one-on-one with a gun advocate who said that lawmakers who vote for gun control have blood on their hands. could he be serious? >>> and why the second amendment doesn't say what you think 2 does. >>> plus a class gunned down, a teacher to protect them. main who lost his daughter. >> they believe that because the problem is guns the answer is guns. it's simply ridiculous. >> we'll go inside the mind of a killer. what dr. oz thinks we should do about mental illness. >> i think we need a homeland security approach to mental illness. thirst is "piers morgan tonight." >>> good evening, final farewells today for two more 6-year-olds, victims of the terrible attacks in sandy hook. jessica rekos was a little girl who loved horses and asked santa for cowgirl boots and cowboy hat and james mattioli who asked once how old do i have to be to sing on stage. president
from now 10:00 p.m. eastern. piers morgan starts right now. >> tonight the top five things that america is talking about. number one, peace love and mutual understanding. >> we can't negotiate with ourselves. >> it is me. >> bob costas, did he cross the line. >> and the most outrageous royal prank over. >> hello there. could i please speak to kate please, my granddaughter? >> this is piers more dpgan ton. good evening. our big story tonight from what every one is talking about. the royal prank called heard around the world. and this shocking new york subway photograph. reports of chemical weapons in syria. let's get started with what promises to be a lively discussion. and a host of huff posts live. and welcome to you all. let's start with guns and the fall out of the murder and suicide of jovan bellcher. let's watch what he said tonight. >> i believe that there should be more effective controls on the sale of guns. >> roughly 40% of the guns purchased in this country do not require a background check for purchasing. i don't see in anyone should be able to purchase military style or bod
the wealthiest men in america, merchants, among them, john hancock, yes, thee bold john hancock on the declaration of independence whose name is synonymous with signature. long before that, he was arguably the wealthiest merchant banker in america living on beacon hill with a commanding view of the massachusetts landscape and sea scape. far from espousing individual liberty, hancock and his fellow merchants in new england, governed their businesses and communities with economic ruthlessness that often left their competitors homeless and penniless. like today's tea party movement, the colonial tea party had almost nothing to do with tea. tea was nothing more than a social beverage for wealthy women. men seldom draping it, and it ranked below ail and rum among beverages americans consumed most. the tea party movement that sparked the american revolution actually began 20 years earlier in the 1750s and 1760s when new england business leaders like today's tea party supported a costly government war, but refused to pay higher taxes to cover the cost of that war. the war had started i
.com/booktv. >> for the next 45 minutes, larry schweikart presents a history of america's global participation and influence from 1898-1945. he also posits that during this time the united states introduced numerous political, cultural, and economic ideas to the rest of the world. >> good afternoon. thank you for joining us here at the heritage foundation in our lewis lemon auditorium. we, of course, welcome those who joins honor heritage.org website on all of these. would ask everyone here in house if you'd be so kind to check cell phones one last time and see that they are turned off. thank you, louis. amazing how many speakers actually start doing that. we will post the program on a website within 24 hours for your future reference, and, of course, our internet viewers are always welcome to e-mail us with questions or comments, simply writing those to speaker@heritage.org. our guest today, doctor larry schweikart is a native arizonan turkey on this bachelor and masters degree at arizona state university and received his doctorate from university of california, santa barbara. throughout his high school an
these things that happened. it happened in the united states of america. you have disparate economies in the united states of america that are bound together monetarily. missouri and washington state are as different as germany and greece. what is it that keeps the united states together? you had a great depression here in the 1930's. things were awful. and yet, i do not believe there were any political movements to get rid of the deficit states from the united states, like there are in europe and portugal and spain and everywhere else that happens to be in deficit. the reason is, the federal- state, especially after 1929 plays the role of the regulator of surplus and deficit recycling around the land. let me give you a simple example. we are in seattle. boeing is sponsoring the lectures. when boeing goes to washington to give a contract for the next generation jet or whatever, they may get it. they do get it. but there are some things attached. like for instance, we want a factory that builds the wings are the engines in tennessee or missouri or arizona. in the deficit regions. this
at this is basically something that you can ride along and freeload and let america and canada and japan handled? >> steve, your question -- >> i'm and freeload, by the way. >> that by the way is how the chinese would describe any relationship between japan and america. the interesting aspect of all these conflicts is that as india and china and india and china have a proximate geographically, but we've never been neighbors. >> right. >> in order to be neighbors you either have to love each other or hate each other. we have done neither. in fact, in 1962 during the first strategic conflict, between these two, you have to understand, it's hard to understand why we are not neighbors. [inaudible] in terms of inaccessible. but the positions, the lines, the strategies, the lines, what would they resonate to? the positions that are taken by postcolonial nations is that we will not be bound by decisions made by colonial powers. one, or in china's case, that we had to abandon our national positions. and now that we are strong, we need to resurrect them. right or wrong is not, that is very little to do w
>>> tonight, the top five things that america is talking about. number one, peace love and mutual understanding. yeah, right. not in washington. >> i won't play that game. >> we can't negotiate with ourselves. >> it is me. >> number three, bob costas. did he cross the line? number five, the most outrageous royal prank ever. >> hello there. could i please speak to kate please, my granddaughter? >> this is piers morgan tonight. good evening. our big story tonight from what every one is talking about. washington's high-stakes game of "let's make a deal," to the royal prank called heard around the world. to bob costas talking about guns. and this shocking new york subway photograph. reports of chemical weapons in syria. let's get started with what promises to be a lively discussion. abbe huntsman, and a host of huff posts live. and welcome to you all. let's start with guns and the fallout of the murder and suicide of jovan bellcher and his girlfriend. bob costas of nbc spoke out about this. let's watch what he said tonight. >> i believe that there should be more comprehensive and effe
with christmas shoppers. this is the type of gun police say he used. an ar-15 semiautomatic rifle. america with more gun stores than grocery stores. tonight, eyewitnesses tell me what they saw when they started. i talk a gun advocate who says there should have been more guns in that mall. and the mother of the aurora, colorado, victims, who thinks the opposite. and talks about guns, north korea's nuclear threat. and the man at both sides of the gun debate, mark kelly. >> president obama hasn't really addressed the gun issue at all. >> this is piers morgan tonight. good evening. our big story tonight, america armed. a day after another gun outrage, a young 22-year-old shoots up a mall of christmas shoppers in oregon. here's the statistics. there's more than 129,000 federally licensed firearms dealers in this country. that's according to the bureau of alcohol and tobacco. there's 16,000 grocery stores and 14,000 mcdonald's restaurants. far more places to buy guns in america than groceries or burgers. 47,856 people murdered by firearms between 2006 and 2010. two more murdered in clackamas cen
in asia and africa and the americas or do you basically surrender to decline? and i think that requires very tough choices about the time and energy and education systems and welfare systems and being not prepared to tolerate poor performance. >> rose: and rick stengel, managing editor of "time" magazine talking about "time" magazine's person of the year. >> i always like to feel the person who wins person of the year it's both backward looking in terms of the year past and forward looking in terms of what that person will do in the next year and beyond and obama is a perfect example of that. the next america is the america of today. which is why in effect he's person of the year. because he's the architect of this new america and i actually think it's a great thing because it's a more tolerant america, a more diverse america. >> rose: osborne and stengel. next. caioning spoored by roseommunications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: george osborne is here. he is britain's chancellor of the exchequer. he has been called the austerity chancellor. he continu
disgraceful. george will is one of the most recognizable people in america today. certainly, the most widely known intellectual. he is the author of the least a dozen books. since the early days of the show, he has been a regular on what is now "this week with george stephanopoulos." he is an astute philosopher. he is a native of illinois, a student of baseball, a lifelong cubs fan, and as such, he is a man of sorrows and acquainted with grief. [laughter] despite their rudeness of the invitation, he is my friend. george well. -- george will. [applause] >> jack's invitation is perfectly acceptable. my dear friend william f. buckley once called up his friend charleton heston, the actor, and said chuck, do you believe in free speech? he said, of course. he said good, you are about to give one. it is a delight to be back here. it is a delight to be back on campus. long ago and far away, i was a college professor. in 1976, two of my friends ran for the senate against each other in new york state. the night they were both nominated, jim buckley got up and said, i look forward to running against pr
america is the america of today. which is why in effect he's person of the year. because he's the architect of this new america and i actually think it's a great thing because it's a more tolerant america, a more diverse america. >> rose: osborne and stengel. next. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: george osborne is here. he is britain's chancellor of the exchequer. he has been called the austerity chancellor. he continues to lead the increasingly controversial austerity process. in a piece called "god sieve the british economy" in the upcoming "new york times" magazine adam davidson writes "in the past two years the united states has experienced a steep downturn followed by steady though horrendously slow upturn. the british economy, however, is profoundly stuck. the u.k. has been put on negative watch on three largest credit rating agencies. the european union is britain's largest trading partner, europe's economy remains on prepares you footing despite several months of relative calm and there's a
by securing america's future energy, this is about an hour-and-a-half. >> good morning, everyone. thank you all for coming. i especially want to thank the members of the energy security leadership council for being with us today. they have been a distinguished group of people working on this issue since 2006. we are nothing without their credibility as the great ceo's, an entrepreneur, and military leaders of our time. i also want to give a special>> i want to give a special thanks to the staff at securing america's future energy. we stand on the shoulders and the time it takes to get these reports. the policy staff, james, leslie, the staff that puts these together, our political staff and the rest of the team at safe. we're seeing more production than we have ever seen before. the most production in the last couple of decades of year on year growth. oil imports are falling. the demand for oil continues to decline based on fuel economy standards and other reasons. we still continue to have a problem. the report we are releasing today and the subtitle says it all. harnessing american resour
that have made america a beacon of hope and freedom. many yearn for basic human liberties. the people of western sa harrah have been trapped in oppressive conditions under the puppet regime. the front has instituted masked kidnappings of people from their homes into western algeria. they have been in prison in camps for 35 years. the front colbrates with the likes of cuba who ration food in the camp and indoctor rin ate children while partnering with al qaeda. they have a plan, which i will submit for the record that addresses these issues with a clear and democratic solution to the sa harrah crisis. this is where america support should lie. mr. speaker, the united states can and must continue to advance fundamental human rights as we in this chamber continue to work together for peace, justice and human dignity in the western sahara. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. are there further requests for one-minute speeches? the house will be in order. members and staff, remove your conversations off the floor. under the speaker's announced policy o
that -- formula ever in the history of america -- economics that more american energy equals more american jobs, i don't know what it is. it is all the jobs you have if you of a reliable supply of energy. the front page of the "the wall street journal" indicates a difficulty of connecting this cheap product we have in natural gas. we thought we would run out natural-gas as a country. connecting this cheap product with a more expensive market and getting it overseas. if we could become energy self- sufficient, that does not mean we would not buy on the world market, but if we could meet our needs in the north american markets, almost all of that money comes back to us. we have no better trading partner than canada. nafta has increased the trading capacity of mexico. it has gone somewhere from the 40% range and a growing and, -- 57 neighborhood to the high 40's to the mid-70s's now, and they are quickly catching up with canada. when you buy energy in north america, they give you the money back. that was a lot to solve the problems. if you make your position better as a nation, suddenly, your numbers
, michael ian black, three names. he is the co author of america, you sexy bleep. and our new york times cory correspondent. go good to see you, irch p. pinch. >> and how it has had an affect on marine mammals. specifically the blue whale population, said one exclusive to the times. >> make it stop. >> i am paraphrasing, of course. greg, still on screen. i believe they call this a two fer. >> >> on sunday night, a day of the week, president obama greeted psy at the annual christmas in washington concert, if that is his real name amid controversy over the anti-american sentiments. he is now known for hiking gangnam style, but huey was once filled with bile. he said "kill those f-ing yankees killing the captives" he has since apologized saying it was part of a deep emotional reaction. he made sure to praise the sacrifice of the troops in a short speech. he engs inked others, but not psy. later he said one performance impressed him. >> good to see that ed asner made the trip. mib, in the green m -- in the green room he didn't bash him enough. >> they were the original koreans. you would rea
are wearing. let's think about this, america. >> my outrage of the day. on that note, thank you so much for watching "street signs." >> that is a thing that makes you go hmm, and we'll see you tomorrow. "closing bell" is next right here on cnbc which is the worldwide leader in business news. >> hi, everybody. we're into the final stretch. welcome to the "closing bell." i'm maria bartiromo with the new york stock exchange. the more wall street washington is rising above, the higher the market goes. >> rejection of how john boehner's plan "b" thatty had came out with today. the major averages are all trading around two-month highs today because it seems like progress is still being made on some kind of a deal. here's where we stand right now. the dow up 98 points, was up 125 at the high, and then the white house rejected and some comments by senate majority leader harry reid on that so-called plan "b" proposal from john boehner, sort of took some of the wind out of the sails. nasdaq still up 1.25%, a 3348 and the s&p 500 index is up 12-plus points right now at 1443. >> while the dow on pa
. there is no debt crisis in the united states of america and europe, and there is no such thing as the debt crisis in my own country, which is nevertheless being consumed by debt. you know the joke about balloonist. the balloon has been blown off isrse, and at some point they no such thing as a debt crisis. manage to gain control of the balloon and lower it above a farm. the farmer comes out and looks up at the balloon and one of the balloonists says, excuse me, sir, where are we? and the farmer says, you are in a balloon. the balloonist says, he must be an economist. precisely accurate, and hopelessly useless. [laughter] we have a doctor here amongst us. imagine if you had a terrible case of a cancer patient in acute pain, and your diagnosis was, the person is experiencing a pain crisis. it wouldn't be useful. debt is a symptom of 2008, to be precise. it is what happens when a financial implosion begins on wall street, and then all sorts of dark forces break out, break loose, and they start dismantling the economic and social fabric of the world. these awful events happen once every hundred years
to issue when he moved with the slaves to latin america. arrived with the knowledge that issue was feared by the christian missionaries. the slaves adopted issue as their patron deity, just to scare the christians who wanted them to convert. issue became the paramount symbol of resistance in latin america and the americas. in fact, it went beyond that. in some parts of brazil, for instance, you find that issue has even been elevated to the supreme deity simply because that was a symbol that was there, the protagonist for freedom. as they find the transposition of deities across the atlantic, not minor, became not only the symbol of resistance in the new world, but the supreme deity in certain parts of brazil. like brazilla, for instance. if you go to the heartland of the europa in brazil, and it's quite plain. but in certain parts issue became the supreme deity. now, consider today -- this was the history of the missionaries in africa, and it goes back a couple of centuries. now, imagine that kadi -- to be a faller of the religion, is virtually to earn the death sentence in certain parts
. >>> also, let me tell you about the biggest success story in latin america. it is not brazil. it's actually much closer to home. then, as the world watches the arab world struggle with democracy, we'll take a look at the problem from an unusual perspective, upside down. how does a country turn away from democracy as eastern europe did 50 years ago? i'll talk to pulitzer-prize winning historian ann applebalm. we focus on decision making. in the depths of the financial crisis, the obama administration had an almost impossible choice -- save chrysler by injecting billions of taxpayer dollars, or let it fail and lose perhaps a million jobs. car czar steve rattner gives us a fascinating inside look. for viewers in the united states, we have a special tonight at 8:00 and 11:00 p.m. eastern and pacific called "tough decisions." >>> but, first, here's my take. announcing that he would send proposals on reducing gun violence in america to congress, president obama this week mentioned a number of sensible gun control measures. but he also paid homage to the washington conventional wisdom about the ma
buzz. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. egypt's military is on security watch, ordered by the president to a rest civilians who threaten the state. on saturday, and egypt will hold a controversial referendum on the constitution. there will be competing mass protests and there are fears of violence. almost two years since the arab spring began, this is not the most positive way to mark an anniversary. tonight we start a week of coverage. >> the presidential guard is like an army within an army. it has one job above all else, to protect the leader. they have even built a wall or run the presidential palace. how was it possible that a man elected five months ago is now barricaded behind giant concrete blocks? >> an mp from the president friedman justice party. for decades, under the old regime. -- the freedom and justice party. they fear a conspiracy organized by the old guard. >> we want to get rid of the black spots of the mubarak regime. that hinder our development, that hinder are going to a new egypt. >> he ought to be here in egypt's par
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the dead in newtown, connecticut, and all week, the argument over the kind of guns available in america and the kind of people that can get all of them. it has gone back and forth. while the fire he said raged, the gunman killed himself. he had already spent 17 years in prison for killing his grandmother. as a convicted criminal, he was not allowed to possess firearms. a cold christmas awaits the families of two firefighters. bbc news, washington. >> in afghanistan, at least seven security officials including an american adviser have been killed by local police officers. in the first shooting, a policewoman opened fire inside the police headquarters, killing the americans. it is the first time a female member of the afghan services has turned on a member of the nato force. a report. >> the 33-year-old was a sergeant with the afghan national police, and earlier this morning, the woman shot and killed a civilian adviser. according to officials, she had planned to kill senior afghan officials but could not find any so shot the advisor instead. at the police headquarters, it is one of the m
out their vote and is going to be exploited by virtually every merchandiser in america. >> obama's campaign manager and the rest of the team for the ground game they pulled together which the romney team laughed at first. they are not laughing now. >> mark. >> thank you. magnificent. >> is this it? >> let's see what conac has given us. the biggest winner of 2012 vladimir putin. he overcame massive opposition protests, maneuvered through constitutional loopholes, served as president, then prime minister. and then when re-elected as president again of planet earth's biggest nation, russia. vladimir putin biggest winner of 2012. >> "biggest loser," pat? >> general david petraeus. cia most famous general of his generation caught in a honey trap and kwon. >> the nra national rifle association which has no answer to why americans should be allowed to buy and possess assault weapons with rounds they can shoot off and kill little children. >> mark. >> the 23 million americans who remain out of work and have been out of work for a long period of time. >> seldom aidle son who backed candid
percentage points. bank of america is the biggest gainer hitting a 52-week high. david: energy stocks rising as oil climbed about $0.37 to settle above the $87 mark. energy sh giants chevron and coo ending in the plus. liz: consumer names getting a boost. adding time warner, walgreens, we just spoke, this is of course a consumer staple that people have loved along with names of her shoes. gettinhitting repetitive 52-week highs. david: apple, the ceo says he has a responsibility to create jobs, but how about creating shareholder value, where should the focus be after two months of a 25% loss of share value, should that be the target of tim cook and apple? liz: this is a huge crane maker and a food company have a great year, the stock up 70% thanks in part to having his hands in the cranes and food services part. he is going to be joining us exclusively this hour. here's why you have listened to him. is he keeping up pace in the new year and what part of his business is doing better. david: we have a very busy hour coming up, but what drove the market with the "data download." stocks pushing h
. >>> when we come back on squawk, bank of america ceo brian moynihan in his own words, we caught up with him yesterday to talk about business, the economy and the looming figure. as we head into a break, bank of america, best performing dow component of the year. up about 77%. ♪ [ male announcer ] how could switchgrass in argentina, change engineering in dubai, aluminum production in south africa, and the aerospace industry in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. nespresso. where i never have to compromise on anything. ♪ where just one touch creates the perfect coffee. where every cappuccino and latte is only made with fresh milk. and where the staff is exceptionally friendly. ♪ nespresso. what else? indicated up 14 points. unable to hold on to the gains we saw yesterday
that america needs to go back to work. it's just a matter of having the will to do it, the programs are out there. compromise can be made around the streamlining of regulations to make sure that we are putting people back to work. if chris christy and barack obama can get -- chris cristie and barack obama can get together on that, and i know what's transpired and how the impact of our infrastructure has taken place along the eastern seaboard, it's something we ought to be able to rally around immediately. and of course everyone, everyone deserves a $250,000 tax break. we all agree on that. so why not just simply adopt it and then come back and we'll have time to address the issues as it relates to bending the cost curve on health care and focusing on the vast inefficiencies, the fraud, the abuse and the waste that totals more than $750 billion annually? as for the chairman from my district said, list, it would be a way for us to bring down the deficit but also make health care affordable, accessible and functional for the american people. something i believe we must do. with that let me int
than ever before. >> rose: you're bullish on america? >> i think on the energy side for sure. and i'd say on the -- the one thing that never goes away in the united states is the incredible accept of entrepreneurs. so i think if we can get a set of great entrepreneurs, we can go after some big opportunities like energy. there's no reason why the united states can't continue to grow. >> rose: can manufacturing come back to america? >> if you looked -- i'm 30 year g.e. guy. so when i started it was probably 25% of american jobs were manufacturing, now it's 9%. so it is going to go back to be 25% again? probably not. could it be in the low teens? yes. >> rose: apple just announced today -- >> i saw that. i saw what tim did. we brought jobs back to the united states. i think american work force is very productive. i think in the sets of technologies that we make today you can make them here. i actually think that the relationships in general between unions and business and things like that have all progressed over time and the work force is very productive. so there's no reason why the
money" starts right now. >>> just days to go before america goes over a fiscal cliff. an outcomeloing more likely every hour. washington's willingness to take america to the brink threatens its prosperity. this is about the latest movement in the negotiation between the democrats and republicans comes down to useless symbolic moves and haggling between grown men. your elected officials are wasting time while the clock ticks. house speaker john boehner announced his plan b to let bush-era tax cuts expire for earners making more than $1 million a year and he wants to set automatic spending cuts with unspecified cuts elsewhere. the speaker pulled his so-called plan b for lack of support from his own party because many republicans still beholden to grover nor quest and the ridiculous pledge want no compromise at all. the debate between the two sides centers around a balanced approach the budget. republicans say president obama wants too much revenue. that's taxes in normal speak and not enough cuts. >> at some point we're going to have to address the spending problem that we have. we can'
of america. every time you come to this floor it's a question, why are we here? we are here to do the people's work. let's sit down. get it done. and move forward. instead of filling the agenda however worthy some of those initiatives may be, instead of not along with passing a middle income tax -- this is also reminiscent of a year ago. the president proposed, the house and senate, democrats and republicans, voted for the payroll tax holiday. the republicans in the house resisted. painted themselves into a corner until they had no choice. the issue had been made too hot for them to handle and they finally had to come around to supporting the payroll tax holiday. and here we are again. 100% of the american people will receive a tax cut when we pass the middle income tax cut. the wealthiest people in our country will receive a tax cut up to their income of $250,000. we are asking them to pay a little bit more for what they make over $250,000 a year. to help reduce the deficit, to help grow the economy, grow the economy. that growth is what is essential. you want to reduce the deficit, create
-founder of america online. is a rabid twitter. i feel like i know every detail of your life. and a relentless of entrepreneurship. we're very fortunate to have these three panelistings. they get five to seven minutes -- there will be a little time left. five to seven minutes to discuss the topic and we're going have a discussion among us then we will open it up to you and hopefully, we will get to all of your comments and questions. >> i'm delighted to be here this evening because i think the topics is important. this conference also recognizes mark kaplan who is that i am pleased to speak in behalf of tonight. we're looking tonight at immigration policies and how they affect our eighty to attract high-skilled immigrants. engineers and entrepreneurs who contribute to innovation. because universities and colleges are in the talent business. we're in a global competition for talent. all yustses, but particularly research university, are competing to get the best and brightest. if immigration policies make it differently for international students to come to the united states then we undercut ou
that was and the challenges facing us in 2013. first to our big stories of 2012. and america's left turn from the supreme court's landmark health care decision to the reelection of president barack obama. and politics headed in a decidedly liberal direction, so what happened and what does it mean for the country going forward. joining us columnist and detail editor, dani henninger and kim strassel. dan, we like to say for a long time we live in a center-right country. if you look at the last two presidential elections that doesn't seem to be the case. are we living now in a new, progressive era? >> in terms of the presidency, i think we are, paul. i'm not sure about the country. barack obama i think is the center left or left wing president since the great depression and i think that what barack obama has in mind to do is indeed to redistribute income from the top downward, not to cut spending, but to increase spending, it's explicit from a 20% of gdp to 25% gdp and rather than cut spending raise taxes as necessary to support that spending and i would say that is in fact essentially the french model. and
. >> foreign policy is actually not foreign. >> america has faced great hardship before and each time we have risen to the challenge. >> the ultimate test is to move our society from where it is to where it has never been. >> join us as we explore today's most critical global issues. join us for great decisions. (instrumental music) >> great decisions is produced by the foreign policy association, inspiring america's to learn more about the world. sponsorship of great decisions is provided by credit suisse, eni, the hurford foundation and pricewaterhousecoopers llp. >> coming up next, sacred cow: defending america on a budget. (instrumental music) (marching music) >> the u.s. spent the last century fighting well-defined wars against well-heeled enemies. ♪ stop! >> duck and cover up under the table. first you duck and then you cover. >> but the fall of the berlin wall meant the collapse of the traditional enemy and the military struggled to find its purpose in this post soviet world. >> we have to understand the role that the united states has played since the end of the second world war and
on with the financials is bank of america. bank of america hit a 52 week high, sold off, was like a number one loser in if the dow, number two loser in the dow and then moved back and came up off the lows. so it shows you the financials really drive the market one way or another. you really get a good feel. david: bank of america is up over 100% this year even with today's loss. it has incredible turnaround. [closing bell ringing] shibani: the bells are ringing on wall street. it was a roller coaster ride of a day. let's take a look at how stocks are finishing up. it's well on the fence here as to where we're going to close. the dow is lower right now. down about 20 points. the s&p 500 down just about 2 points. nasdaq also eking out a loss, 4.2 points and then the russell also ending the day in the red. david: it was just positive, the dow just moments ago, but it is the turnaround, 150 points since the story. also a trading day for oil, big rally in yesterday's session where it went up to $91 a barrel. crude was unable to hold on to the gains ending lower on fears of no deals in d.c. all of that la
in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. > i'm jim cramer. and welcome to my world. you need to get in the game. firms are going to go out of business and he's nuts, they're nuts! they know nothing! i always like to say there's a bull market somewhere, and i promise -- "mad money," you can't afford to miss it. hey, i'm cramer. welcome to "mad money." welcome to cramerica. other people want to make friends, i'm just trying to save you a little money. my job is not just to entertain but to coach you and teach you. so call me at 1-800-743-cnbc. it is so easy to be negative right now! >> boo! >> incredibly easy. and when the gloom lifts. >> the house of pain. >> it almost feels like a reprieve from some sort of stock market death sentence, as it did today with the dow climbing 83 points. the nasdaq declined .77% largely because of apple, more on that later. now, i am not dismissive of the negativity that i see pretty muc
to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. >>> the headlines on friday looked greatment unemployment rate drops to 7.7%. 146,000 americans score new jobs but the headlines don't tell the whole story. christine romans has the breakdown of the big report and some of the numbers you need to know about. christine? >> let's go beyond the headlines and look deep inside the numberses at, say, the unemployment rate. the underemployment rate. 40% of people who are out of work have been out of work for six months or longer. underemployment still high. 14.4%. some people call it the real unemployment rate. it's almost double what the headline number is. another big problem. let's look at the sectors that are hiring. retail jobs, 53,000. those retailers are hiring up for the holiday season. many of the jobs are temporary. it's hard to send a kid to college on the job -- many of these retail jobs. there aren't always benefitses. some place there are benefit ifs you lo
, the slogan better read than dead. but, we strongly rejected the idea that america represented the losing side in the struggle against soviet expansionism and the communist play that went with it. to the anti-communist passion we shared with chambers, inseparable from a commensurately powerful love for and faith in the united states of america and the civilization for which it had gone to war against the two great carriers of modern totalitarianism, first not see germany and now communist russia. and on like chambers, we believe that the united states would eventually turn back the communist threat to western civilization, just as surely as it had done to the equally evil threat posed by not to germany. not, mind you, that we underestimated the might of the soviet military or the strength and the resolve of the anti anti-communist forces. against as both at home and abroad. in fact, there were times when we came close to a feeling that chambers and other conservative anti-communist like james vernon who wrote a book entitled suicide of the last, we feared that they might be right. for me, one
are kind of methadone clinic. we'll reenact the two percent . part of the bargain let's get america off of a far more dangerous drug than corn or ethanoyl. it hurts food shoppers and tears up the inside of the engine. >> two wrongs don't make a right. what john was referring to was windmills in places like norway. >> and holland. >> and what is happening the wind sector took off in norway and in denmark. at the same time gerald ford and carter were pushing shell gas development. >> and that was viable. >> and that is 50 percent of what is going on in wind energy and equals the price . you net out 15 percent of the oil. are we making these companies economically profitable or if not. they should be killed off and otherwise we are padding the profits. morgan, you still like solar and what about wind. >> the price of that is coming down. wind energy let is it lapse and slash and born corn sib sidies. going back to wind. it is 8,000 percent higher than the cost of natural gas for the same amount of electrical lout put. >> i agree with her on this. >> what is more interesting is what liz sai
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